Try This Illusion Running On The Treadmill

Try This Illusion Running On The Treadmill

The treadmill also trains your brain.

While researching vision at Cambridge University in the ’90s, researcher Adar Pelah noticed something fun happened in the gym: In the first few minutes after getting off the treadmill, he felt like he was moving much faster than he actually did. Pelah documented this observation in a 1996 article.

Many studies since then have tested many of the illusions experienced on the treadmill. One of them is as follows: Run on the machine for at least 10 minutes, then get off and have your friend blindfold you with a cloth. Then try walking where you are. You will notice that you are running forward instead of walking.

While on the treadmill, your body moves, but the world around you does not pass as it does when stepping on solid ground. As a result, optical flow; that is, the visual change of the world as you move is zero. When you get off the machine, the universe moves with you again. With the sudden return of positive optical flow, your brain greatly underestimates the speed at which the visual field around you must move, creating a feeling of acceleration. If you are blindfolded, you will move forward trying to stay still because your body still thinks this forward motion is holding you steady. It takes a few minutes for things to reset and get back to normal.

Pelah says that this illusion covers more than one perception. “As you experience visual information, you need to be controlling your muscles at the same time.” When you put people in a wheelchair after exercise, they don’t realize that something strange happens when you turn the chair. Documenting this change (and a return to normalcy) has helped scientists realize that there is a very close interface between the visual and motor systems in the brain.

Pelah says that this illusion covers more than one perception. “As you experience visual information, you need to be controlling your muscles at the same time.” When you put people in a wheelchair after exercise, they don’t realize that something strange happens when you turn the chair. Documenting this change (and a return to normalcy) has helped scientists realize that there is a very close interface between the visual and motor systems in the brain.

If you use the treadmill too often, your body adapts to this change and the effect disappears. If you need an explanation for why you exercise sporadically, you will find a creative excuse if you say you want to experience this illusion.

While running where you are. Drawing: Brown Bird Design Author: Nicole Wetsman/Popular Science https://popsci.com.tr/

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